HHS Orders FDA to Stand Down on LDTs

The Department of Health and Human Services issued an Aug. 19 rescission order to the FDA directing the agency to cease requiring any premarket reviews for lab-developed tests (LDTs), a change the administration said is consistent with two executive orders (EOs). The order mentions the COVID-19 pandemic, but seems intended to endure beyond the existing declaration of public health emergency.

The question of the FDA’s statutory authority to regulate LDTs has dated back at least as far as the early 1990s. In 2006, the Washington Legal Foundation (WLF) resurrected the question in a citizen’s petition that makes reference to a similar petition filed in 1992. According to the 2006 petition, the FDA waited six years to respond to the earlier petition, and WLF cited “an urgent need for FDA to comply with the Administrative Procedures Act (APA). The APA is also a timely theme, given the Department of Justice’s recent public pronouncement about whether the underlying statute is in need of a legislative update.

The HHS announcement states that the FDA is not authorized to require premarket review of any sort for LDTs absent the use of the rulemaking process. This would supplant the FDA’s use of guidances, immediately-in-effect policy declarations, and any other informal mechanisms. The notice advises, however, that LDTs practiced for testing for the COVID-19 pandemic will not enjoy immunity from product liability under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness (PREP) Act without an emergency use authorization or submission of a regulatory filing under a conventional premarket review path.

At present, there are two competing legislative responses to the impasse making the rounds on Capitol Hill, such as H.R. 6102, the Verifying Leading-edge IVCT Development (VALID) Act of 2020, which has a companion bill in the Senate. While previous iterations of the VALID Act included language directed toward a pre-certification program that seemed to parallel the precert program for software as a medical device, this latest version describes a technology certification process that would ease the demands ordinarily imposed by FDA premarket review. Neither the House nor the Senate version has come up for a vote in committee, however.

Conversely, the Verified Innovation Testing in American Laboratories (VITAL) Act of 2020, sponsored by Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), would place sole authority for LDT regulation under the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. S. 3512 keys on laboratory staffing qualifications to ensure that tests are appropriately developed and conducted, but also has provisions related to the pandemic, such as a requirement that CMS update the related CLIA regulations to address future pandemics. This bill, too, has failed to gain enough traction to merit a vote in the committee of jurisdiction.

PTO Revisiting IPR Rules of Practice

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is considering an amendment to the rules of practice for several patent procedures as indicated by an entry at the electronic dashboard for the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at OMB. The entry is titled to reflect an examination of the rules of practice in trials before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, the entity charged with handling inter partes reviews (IPRs). There is little additional information as to the nature of the proposed changes, however.

The IPR process has come under fairly constant fire in the years since passage of the America Invents Act, including in a 2017 article describing the process as “a patent killing field.” The authors of the article claimed that despite the numbers posted by the PTO, the IPR process proved substantially more hostile toward claims than litigation conducted in Article III courts.

The docket for this proposal lists four meetings, the first of which took place Aug. 4 with members of the Computer & Communications Industry Association. Included in the documents for that Aug. 4 meeting is a file by PTO suggesting that IPR institution rates have dropped from 87% in fiscal year 2013 to 56% to date in fiscal 2020. However, the sheer volume of petitions for IPRs rose from 220 in that first year to more than 1,500 three fiscal years later. The current total for FY 2020 is 854 petitions, 478 of which have been instituted.

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