PTO Eyes Prioritized Patents to Combat Covid-19

The FDA and other agencies at the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services have taken a number of measures to push back against the COVID-19 pandemic, but an agency at the Dept. of Commerce is also getting into the fight. The Patent and Trademark Office recently unveiled a prioritized patent examination pilot that will put COVID-fighting applications to the front of the queue, with a special emphasis on small and micro entities.

The May 8 PTO statement indicates that the agency will waive the fees ordinarily associated with priority patent applications, but also that these applications will be processed within six months, assuming the applicant responds to PTO queries promptly. PTO director Andrei Iancu said small businesses and independent inventors “are often the difference makers when it comes to cutting-edge technology,” but “are also in most need of assistance” as the pandemic wears on.

In the accompanying Federal Register notice, PTO said the scope of the program is limited to products that are subject to an FDA premarket review process, such as emergency use authorizations, premarket approvals and new drug applications. Biologics license applications are also within the scope of the program, but continuing original patent applications are apparently excluded. Filings must include no more than four independent claims and no more than 30 total claims. Multiple dependent claims are also out of consideration, and applicants that file for an extension for time to file a reply will lose their place in this expedited program.

FDA Resets Serology Test Policy for Pandemic

The FDA has maintained a steady pace of policy changes in connection with the COVID-19 pandemic, including a May 4 policy that calls on makers of some serological tests to file for an EUA for their tests. The change followed congressional criticism that many of these tests did not work as advertised, but also followed an extended period during which a large number of tests came to market and thus there was a less pressing need for a relaxed policy.

In an accompanying statement, the FDA said the original testing policy under the emergency use authorization program was borne of a need to provide sufficient regulatory flexibility to bring surveillance testing to the medical front lines. A number of serology tests have arrived with claims of FDA approval or authorization despite lacking such a regulatory acknowledgment, but other tests were shown to perform poorly despite otherwise avoiding the agency’s ire.

Consequently, commercial test developers have 10 days to file for authorization under the EUA program after notifying the agency of the results of test validation, or 10 days after the date of publication of the May 4 policy. High-complexity labs that develop their own tests must still forward validation data to the agency, although they are not required to seek authorization via the EUA program. The FDA recommends they do seek inclusion in the EUA listing, however.

The testing policy was updated again May 9 with the news that the first antigen test for the SARS-CoV-2 virus had gained a place in the EUA policy, and the FDA said more such tests will soon be thus authorized. The anticipation regarding antigen testing is that it will rapidly increase the total volume of tests made to the American public, a critical piece in the effort to bring the pandemic under control. However, the agency advised that antigen testing is even more prone to false negatives than molecular testing for viral RNA, and a negative result for an antigen test may have to be checked by a molecular test – usually a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test – prior to any clinical decision-making.

Still, the FDA noted that antigen tests are less expensive to deploy than PCR tests and usually provide more rapid turn-around. Antigen tests may boost overall testing capacity by millions per day, but the FDA noted that these are intended as diagnostic tests even as the agency noted that they may also aid in the effort to “identify infection rates closer to real time.”