Innovation on Tap at FDA, HHS

Few major U.S. federal government initiatives move as quickly as hoped, but those initiatives are nonetheless crucial for stakeholders in the life sciences intent on bringing innovative products to the clinical setting. The Department of Health and Human Services recently unveiled a program that could bring new drugs and devices to the market more rapidly than has been the case up to now, while the FDA provided an update on its digital health plan that reinforced the notion that the plan will indeed take time to put into place, even as the agency makes changes with the intent of streamlining the plan.

HHS Eyes Faster Medical Product Access

The Department of Health and Human Services said in a recent announcement that it will hold a two-day meeting June 20-21 to obtain stakeholder feedback on how to decrease the time needed for drugs and devices to make their way into clinical use. This is one of the programmatic areas under the ReImagine HHS initiative, and among the topics to be discussed is whether the department should play a role in connecting medical product developers with private payers and Medicaid managed care plans.

HHS said this portion of the proceedings is in response to complaints from both developers and payers that the process of communication between the two sides is inefficient. The FDA’s device center already has an office to facilitate communications with private payers during the device development process, so this move on the part of HHS would presumably scale up the CDRH version and expand it to include pharmaceuticals and biotech therapeutics. Another subject for discussion is “knowledge sharing,” which again is intended to bolster the rate of transmission of medical product innovation to the marketplace, in this case by giving the public more access to both confidential and already publicly available HHS information.

Device makers have complained over the years that public health programs have stifled access to therapies and diagnostics that could represent a meaningful improvement over the current state of the art, and among the initiatives already underway to fix those problems are some changes to the Medicare local coverage determination process. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services also proposed in the draft inpatient prospective payment system for fiscal 2020 to provide coverage to any products that are accepted into the FDA breakthrough devices program. The breakthrough devices coverage concept seen in the 2020 inpatient draft reflects an industry proposal designed to aid small device makers in developing the evidence needed to meet the reasonable and necessary standard for Medicare coverage. The combination of these developments suggests that HHS Secretary Alex Azar has determined that healthcare innovation is hindered by the size of government and the complexity of its regulatory instruments, and that patients are suffering as a consequence.

Precert Test Plan May

The FDA is inching along with its precertification program for software as a medical device, announcing recently that it will accept applications for the precert test plan that will unfold over the balance of the current year and possibly into next year. However, the agency said it will accept applications for the precert program that run dual tracks with either the 510(k) or the de novo program, the former of which was not an explicit part of the precert concept until recently.

The FDA had previously appended the de novo petition process to the precert program in a move some argued was prompted by a desire to avoid accusations that the precert concept was entirely extralegal. The addition of the 510(k) pathway seems to offer no additional benefit in that regard, however, although it would bring on some test cases that reflect the majority of class II device applications, those that are based on a predicate rather than those that represent a technological novelty.

The announcement reiterates that companies involved in the testing phase will not actually obtain precertification merely by virtue of participation in the test phase, although applicants need not subject themselves to the full gamut of precertification evaluation modules. However, the FDA said that participants in the test phase may be limited to companies that have a track record in developing software products, seemingly leaving software start-ups out in the cold. Also of note is that this test plan may run beyond 2019, a sign that regulatory innovation is no less a feat than innovation in medical technology.