Of Combo Products and High Courts

Tourists to our nation’s capital can always find plenty to do, and the same can be said for those in the life sciences with an ear for crucial policy matters. Following are two items of interest to makers of FDA-regulated products, one of which may have a significant influence over FDA regulation over an increasingly important class of medical products, while the other addresses federal prosecution under the responsible corporate officer doctrine.

Misgivings regarding the FDA’s CPPC

The FDA’s Combination Products Policy Council (CPPC) has a pretty serious lift in front of it, not the least of which is the thorny problem of differences in culture and attitude at the various centers that will be caught up in these combo product applications.

For some time, it has been known that many reviewers at the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research are no fans of the 510(k) program, apparently seeing it as an unforgivably fast track to market. Of course, the notion of substantial equivalence is a stranger in a strange land at CDER, which might explain a lot of the antipathy toward 510(k) devices there.

The agency opened a docket at regulations.gov in January, seeking feedback on topics the CPPC might address, and as might be expected, some of the consternation has to do with the process for determining a combo product’s primary mode of action. One concern in particular is how the agency will go about determining what sort of evidence will be needed to establish a product’s PMOA.

Other concerns relate to procedures for handling inter-center disputes regarding PMOA when the Office of Combination Products seems unable to broker a conflict. On the other hand, some have indicated that the interactive review process at CDER is more cumbersome than at the Center for Devices and Radiological Health, and thus would add time to what already promises to be a difficult review process.

One issue that was not conspicuous in comments to the docket was that of user fees. A sponsor will obviously have to pay more if the product’s PMOA is declared to be that of a drug, but what about fee sharing between centers? Will the lead center share user fees with the other center or centers? That’s not clear, and while reviewers at CDRH might find the drug user fees more than adequate, reviewers at CDER might find the device fee schedule unacceptably miserly.

SCOTUS says no to DeCoster

In one of the more interesting Park doctrine cases of recent vintage, the Supreme Court has opted not to hear arguments in the case of Decoster v. U.S., which allows to stand a three-month jail sentence imposed on the father-son ownership team in the egg business.

Many members of the bar see DeCoster as an outlier in that it entailed a jail sentence for Jack and Peter DeCoster, who are said to have been unaware of the violative behavior going on at their company, but more important is the prospect that this case will serve as a precedent for federal prosecutors who want to imprison those in the food, drug and device industries for problematic products. The high court’s decision to pass on the case means the two men will serve their jail sentences, but it also suggests that the Supreme Court will not hear this case until an appeals court other than U.S. Eight Appeals renders a different verdict in a similar case.

It may be an odd source of comfort to note that federal prosecutors will likely try out this new enforcement tool fairly promptly, which suggests that a different appeals court will have a crack at this question in fairly short order. Understandably, nobody in the food, drug or device business wants to serve as the subject of that case, but industry as a whole might want to see this question resolved as quickly as possible.

There is some question as to whether the current composition of the Supreme Court makes this the ideal time to take up such a case, but it’s difficult to predict which of the justices will be the next to leave the Court. Ruth Bader Ginsberg is a leading candidate for retirement because of her age (84), but Anthony Kennedy is no kid, either, as his 81st birthday is fast approaching. A Trump administration replacement for Ginsburg would seem to guarantee DeCoster will be overturned, but those in search of a predictable legal environment might say sooner is better, regardless of the prospects for churn at 1 First St. NE in our nation’s capital.

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